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Do you need Iron supplement?



Iron is a mineral that's necessary for life and plays an important role in immune function. All of your cells contain some iron, but most of the iron in your body is in your red blood cells, which carry oxygen. Red blood cells transport oxygen from your lungs to the organs and tissues throughout your body. Iron has a role in creating energy from nutrients. It also contributes to the transmission of nerve impulses that coordinate the actions of different parts of your body. So you can get iron from food and from supplements. A diet containing too little iron can cause anemia, a low level of red blood cells and weaken the immune system. The average person gets all the iron they need from the foods they eat. But there are certain situations and conditions that may make it necessary to add supplemental iron to your diet.


Iron deficiency anemia

Iron deficiency anemia is caused when there’s not enough iron in your red blood cells. Without healthy levels of iron, your red blood cells cannot effectively provide oxygen to your cells and tissues. Symptoms of anemia including fatigue, weakness, dizziness, difficulty concentrating. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia in the United States. Almost 5 million Americans have it.


Menstruate

Menstruation depletes iron stores. This is why women have higher anemia rates than men. In March 2007, Researchers from University of Kentucky suggested that ethnicity is a risk factor for anemia. It is estimated that 19% of African-American and Mexican-American women are anemic. Compared to 9% - 12% of non-Hispanic white women.


Experience regular blood loss

People who experience excessive blood loss often need extra iron. Regular blood donors and people who have gastrointestinal bleeding are at risk. Gastrointestinal bleeding can be caused by medications or conditions such as ulcers and cancer. Donating blood on a regular basis isn’t recommended if you’re consistently low in iron.


You’re on dialysis

Many people who are on kidney dialysis need extra iron. The kidneys are responsible for making erythropoietin, a hormone that tells the body to make red blood cells. If the kidneys don’t work as well, anemia is often a side effect. You may lose a small amount of blood during dialysis. And dialysis diets also often limit iron intake. Some medications that people on dialysis take can use up iron or interfere with the body’s ability to absorb it.



Take iron depleting medications

Some medications can interfere with your body’s ability to absorb iron. Medications that can deplete iron include:

  • Quinolones, a family of antibiotics that includes ciprofloxacin (Cipro) and levofloxacin (Levaquin)

  • Tetracycline (Panmycin)

  • Ranitidine (Zantac) and omeprazole (Prilosec) for ulcers, heartburn, and other stomach problems

  • Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors for high blood pressure

  • Colestipol (Colestid) and cholestyramine (Prevalite) for cholesterol lowering bile acid sequestrants

If you’re concerned about one of your medicines causing anemia, see your doctor. But don’t stop taking a medication unless you are specifically instructed to do so.

You have ADHD

A 2014 study published in the Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research found that iron deficiency was increasingly associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). After studying blood levels of Iron, Ferritin, Vitamin D, Magnesium, Calcium, and Phosphorus, the researchers found children with ADHD had lower levels of iron and ferritin. Ferritin stores iron inside the cells for later use.



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wearVitamin Co.,Ltd.

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